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Author Topic: Budget minded 3 cabin blue water cruiser Any suggestions? & SA/D ???  (Read 3902 times)
readytosailaway
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Boat Type: Highlander Hull #522, 633, 875....ready for a big boat

« on: September 01, 2011, 04:57:46 pm »

Looking to move my family aboard a boat in the next year or two. Still looking for the "ideal" 3 cabin blue water cruiser. Wish there were an easier way to search for details like that within this database. I've seen a few in the $50 - $75K range. Just nothing yet that has really got me saying that's the boat.

Also, can someone decipher the SA/D logic? I understand that it means Sail Area to Displacement. Having sailed primarily day sailors or One Design dinghies, am I accurate in saying I want a lower # for a higher Displacement and smaller Sail area? Will this even come into  play with storm sails and reefing the sail ??
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sonosail
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« Reply #1 on: September 02, 2011, 10:05:26 am »

Looking to move my family aboard a boat in the next year or two. Still looking for the "ideal" 3 cabin blue water cruiser. Wish there were an easier way to search for details like that within this database. I've seen a few in the $50 - $75K range. Just nothing yet that has really got me saying that's the boat.

Also, can someone decipher the SA/D logic? I understand that it means Sail Area to Displacement. Having sailed primarily day sailors or One Design dinghies, am I accurate in saying I want a lower # for a higher Displacement and smaller Sail area? Will this even come into  play with storm sails and reefing the sail ??
My view is that there are so many factors to consider in the design of a sailboat, that reducing it all to a few indices, like sa/disp. can never be taken as anything more than a very rough guide.  Older, heavier boats generally have a lower number.  But there is nothing about the number that would indicate how well a boat handles when it's reefed or with storm sails.

rb
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Rod Favela
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Boat Type: VX One Design

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« Reply #2 on: January 24, 2012, 09:56:08 pm »

Hard to tell on the price range, but you may consider visiting the sailboat classifieds of the windward islands in the Caribbean. Almost every island from Puerto Rico to Grenada has a fleet of boats for sale...people who crossed the Atlantic and had enough or looking for a new ride. Usually very good deals are found there. Just keep an eye on the standing rigging as the salt and sun in the Caribbean can be very tough on boats and rigs.

My two cents
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Rod Favela
www.velasailingsupply.com
Go sailing...sail hard!
sonosail
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« Reply #3 on: January 25, 2012, 09:44:09 am »

An extra 2 cents:
There has never been a better time for a person looking to BUY a used sailboat. If you enjoy working on boats and you know something about what your doing, you can often purchase fixeruppers for next to nothing.
Just remember that despite the depressed market, people still aren't GIVING away boats of quality that are in good condition. 

rb
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Adelie
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Boat Type: Dread Pirate ship RADIO FLYER

Ahrrrrrr!!!!

« Reply #4 on: February 10, 2012, 01:34:30 pm »

Looking to move my family aboard a boat in the next year or two. Still looking for the "ideal" 3 cabin blue water cruiser. Wish there were an easier way to search for details like that within this database. I've seen a few in the $50 - $75K range. Just nothing yet that has really got me saying that's the boat.

Also, can someone decipher the SA/D logic? I understand that it means Sail Area to Displacement. Having sailed primarily day sailors or One Design dinghies, am I accurate in saying I want a lower # for a higher Displacement and smaller Sail area? Will this even come into  play with storm sails and reefing the sail ??

How many people in your family?  What ages?
What's your max price to buy & outfit?
Do you intend to cruise extensively or just looking for accommodations with benefits?
How much sailing experience in your family?

SA/D is a means of indicating how much sail area is on a boat compared to other boats and it is a rough indication of speed potential in moderate conditions.   For similar boats the boat with the higher SA/D will likely be faster than the other boat in MODERATE wind conditions.  In moderate winds at moderate speeds (at or near hull speed) the wave making component of drag is the dominant part of total drag.

In light wind conditions SA to Wetted surface area is a better indicator of relative speed potential as total drag is dominated by the friction drag portion.  A boat with a higher SA/D probably has a high SA/WSA ratio to, but that is really dependent on hull shape.

In high winds a whole bunch of factors come into play including whether the boat is stable enough to continue carrying enough sail, how heavy the boat is  and whether the hull is shaped to surf or plane.  A lower Displacement to Length Ratio and higher SA/D ratio would indicated better speed potential but probably also a boat that takes more attention to sail acceptably let alone well.

In general a higher SA/D indicates better speed potential but there are a lot of modifiers.
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A house is but a boat so poorly built and so firmly run aground that no one would think to try and refloat it.
Adelie
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Boat Type: Dread Pirate ship RADIO FLYER

Ahrrrrrr!!!!

« Reply #5 on: February 10, 2012, 01:44:25 pm »

I think I missed a bit of the OP's question with my previous answer about SA/D.  The ratio is intended that you can compare relative sail carrying capabilities for boats of different sizes and weights.  The idea that boats with similar lengths and SA/D will have similar speed potential in moderate winds even if one is significantly heavier than the other.  For boats of very different lengths and in high or low winds the ratio is less useful.
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A house is but a boat so poorly built and so firmly run aground that no one would think to try and refloat it.
sonosail
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« Reply #6 on: February 10, 2012, 02:25:15 pm »

I think I missed a bit of the OP's question with my previous answer about SA/D.  The ratio is intended that you can compare relative sail carrying capabilities for boats of different sizes and weights.  The idea that boats with similar lengths and SA/D will have similar speed potential in moderate winds even if one is significantly heavier than the other.  For boats of very different lengths and in high or low winds the ratio is less useful.
I don't want to say the SA/D is completely worthless, because I don't think it is.
But, of course, the most important number that is not part of this particular calculation is draft. The sailing characteristics of 2 boats that might have the same SA/D, where one draws 2', and the other 6', will probably be very different. Then there is beam, at, or near the waterline, a number that we will never see published, will have a major influence on a boats initial stability and sail carrying ability.
The point is that these types of calculations can be helpful as long we realize their limits.

Randy Browning
sailboatdata.com
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