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Author Topic: Cygnus 20 Class  (Read 4903 times)
barklakemike
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« on: October 28, 2009, 03:24:07 pm »

George Hinterhoeller in Niagara actually designed and built the first the HR 20 as he called it, in 1963. I completed #12 in 1964 from a hull and deck kit plus all the bits, that he sold me new for $1200. A class association formed in 1965 or 66 and the boat was renamed the Cygnus class.

The tooling was sold to Skene in Ottawa, (who also made Albacores); when Hinterhoeller became one of three boatbuilders (including Morch in Belleville and Bruckmann in Oakville) who combined forces to make up the manufacturing side of the new C and C yachts. Besides the error in date of introduction, you should also know that the Cygnus was available with either a fixed cast iron keel and 2 ft 9 in draft, or with a fully retracting steel centerboard, when it weighed only 600 lbs. It planed easily as a centerboard boat.  My boat is still sailing in Montreal 45 years later with its second owner.

Great memories.

Mike
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sonosail
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« Reply #1 on: October 29, 2009, 11:14:29 am »

Thanks very much. I will update update listings to reflect this information.  I have quoted an extract of your comments in the record.  I hope this is OK.

Regards,
Randy Browning
Norwalk, CT
sailboatdata.com

George Hinterhoeller in Niagara actually designed and built the first the HR 20 as he called it, in 1963. I completed #12 in 1964 from a hull and deck kit plus all the bits, that he sold me new for $1200. A class association formed in 1965 or 66 and the boat was renamed the Cygnus class.

The tooling was sold to Skene in Ottawa, (who also made Albacores); when Hinterhoeller became one of three boatbuilders (including Morch in Belleville and Bruckmann in Oakville) who combined forces to make up the manufacturing side of the new C and C yachts. Besides the error in date of introduction, you should also know that the Cygnus was available with either a fixed cast iron keel and 2 ft 9 in draft, or with a fully retracting steel centerboard, when it weighed only 600 lbs. It planed easily as a centerboard boat.  My boat is still sailing in Montreal 45 years later with its second owner.

Great memories.

Mike
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Daniel Garvey
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Boat Type: 20 Gygnus centerboard 1965 #93

« Reply #2 on: June 14, 2012, 06:40:45 am »

Hello,   first timer, never too late....My first boat which I still own is a centerboard 20 Cygnus 1965 #93; an amazing amazing boat sailed out Toronto, out of Humber park public lanche ramps without motor for the first two years; did more damage to the docks than I need to my boat.   I presently have it dry docked going throught complete restoration complete with many modifications planned; electrical system, boom tent addition, and most importantly I want to add water to the air pockets as needed and required for extra balist and stablity.   I have had the boat out in 60 km winds Lake Ontario; only time I ever reefed the main; three boats went down that day; not mine.

Now that I have the name right as I was told it was Signet; I am hoping get some specs.    I have pictures if anyone is interested.

the reason for extra water balist is that it came that way when I bought it used 25 years ago; totally unknown to anyone till I had some work done to it after owning it about five years; 3/4 hole drilled into the air pocket it gushed water for 45 minutes; I was told I had no leaks what so ever and suspected that water seeped throught the wood over the years.   Now the boat floates above the the water line totally new boat.    Also it made me very safe as I learned and taught myself to sail;   After a bad break from sailing I took it out in Lake Ontario, Wellington Southern winds good 25km 3 - 4 waves and was getting knocked all over the place; when I had the water balist the boat would bash through those waves much better ride.

Any comments, questions, or advice would be appreciated
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sonosail
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« Reply #3 on: June 14, 2012, 10:35:32 am »

Specs are here:
http://sailboatdata.com/viewrecord.asp?class_id=32 In case you didn't see them.

I would love to see some pictures.
I wouldn't recommend using water as ballast in this way.

Regards,
Randy Browning
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Daniel Garvey
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Boat Type: 20 Gygnus centerboard 1965 #93

« Reply #4 on: June 17, 2012, 09:52:02 pm »

Thanks for your response.    Pictures to follow later this week; I might even post a video or two if possible    Regarding the water balist the boat came that way when  I bought it used over 20 years ago weighing close to 3000 lbs with the double axle wiscott trailer; sailed in Toronto and stored in North Bay during the winters.    It wasn't till I had some minor work done that I discovered the water in the air pockets after owning it at least five years.    With the water balist the boat would bash 4 - 5 foot waves never getting knocked around what so ever and acted like a keel boat; of course having only air in the air pockets the boat would float above the waterline which is fine for northern winds but if the southern winds blow the extra blast makes for much better sail.   In  other words I will have the best of both worlds by designing a system of adding and removing water as I see fit.    And I all ready know it works that way because I sailed this boat this way for at least 5 years.   
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Daniel Garvey
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Boat Type: 20 Gygnus centerboard 1965 #93

« Reply #5 on: August 11, 2012, 08:11:25 am »

I have been busy working on my boat but here are some pictures of my baby.   Hope you enjoy..   Not the storm jib is tiedyed and will be doing all the sails this way next summer after winter mods and repairs.

later


Daniel
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sonosail
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« Reply #6 on: August 11, 2012, 10:48:16 am »

I have been busy working on my boat but here are some pictures of my baby.   Hope you enjoy..   Not the storm jib is tiedyed and will be doing all the sails this way next summer after winter mods and repairs.

later


Daniel

Wow!  How do you do that! (I mean with the jib.)  Pretty cool.

rb
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Daniel Garvey
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Boat Type: 20 Gygnus centerboard 1965 #93

« Reply #7 on: August 12, 2012, 11:17:52 am »

Fairly simple, just basic colouring I think food colouring same as you would use doing tee shirts used to date and hang around artist in Toronto; didn't do the main sail or geno sail because it would run and stain when wet but seems to be fine after many years seem fine; and I 'll be doing the same with all sails for next summer.
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sonosail
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« Reply #8 on: August 13, 2012, 08:35:07 am »

Right.
Now that I think of it, most T shirts are probably do contain some polyester fibers.
rb

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