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Author Topic: Sailing Dinghy Question  (Read 3339 times)
CqCasting
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« on: December 06, 2009, 10:50:56 pm »

In useing "One Design & Offshore Yachtsman - Encyclopedia of Sailing" I found my "Blue Jay" Specs: 13'6" x 5'2" x 3'6"-6".
SA: 90; spinnaker: 55. Hiking assists: straps. Hull: wood or fiberglass. Spars: wood, aluminum. Buoyancy: positive flotation.
Kits, plans available. Crew: 2. Area: 1-12. Number: US 5,100; world 5,500. Rules: one-design. Price: $1300. - $1800.
Designer: Sparkman & Stephens.

Due to some centerboard problems and rot in the bow I'm rebuilding with some small modifications. What I would like to know is if it's feasable to convert this boat into a self bailer. If so what all would I need to do? I was thinking I'd need to place floatation foam in the floor and glass in a solid floorboard. Then cut drain ports in the transom.

Any thoughts, and feedback is most welcome.
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sonosail
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« Reply #1 on: December 07, 2009, 11:10:14 am »

I actually used to own a Blue Jay. (very old wood one)  I wouldn't trying this. Even the ones that were built to self bail aren't all that good. (post #5200 ??) I would be EXTREMELY hard to do. Especially with a wood boat. The floatation would have to extend all the way forward. Not to mention that you would need side tanks also which would need to extend fairly far forward to make it truly 'self rescuing'.  Otherwise, when the boat fills up, all the water will go forward. And unless you bond everything perfectly, water will always find it's way to the bilge. (below flotation).  Have a look at one of the ones that were built to be self rescuing just to see what you're getting into.
That being said, the Blue Jay is nice boat and pretty safe. It's just that the design doesn't lend itself to the self rescuing feature in my opinion.
Best of Luck.
Randy Browning
sailboatdata.com
 
In useing "One Design & Offshore Yachtsman - Encyclopedia of Sailing" I found my "Blue Jay" Specs: 13'6" x 5'2" x 3'6"-6".
SA: 90; spinnaker: 55. Hiking assists: straps. Hull: wood or fiberglass. Spars: wood, aluminum. Buoyancy: positive flotation.
Kits, plans available. Crew: 2. Area: 1-12. Number: US 5,100; world 5,500. Rules: one-design. Price: $1300. - $1800.
Designer: Sparkman & Stephens.

Due to some centerboard problems and rot in the bow I'm rebuilding with some small modifications. What I would like to know is if it's feasable to convert this boat into a self bailer. If so what all would I need to do? I was thinking I'd need to place floatation foam in the floor and glass in a solid floorboard. Then cut drain ports in the transom.

Any thoughts, and feedback is most welcome.
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CqCasting
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« Reply #2 on: December 08, 2009, 11:33:43 pm »

Thanks Sonosail, I will heed your advise as I've not seen another Blue Jay around. I did launch her once and felt a little unstable. Couldn't see how it would handel two crew. I will make the repairs needed and hope to learn sailing her without capsizing.
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Barney Post
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« Reply #3 on: December 09, 2009, 09:38:24 am »

Thanks Sonosail, I will heed your advise as I've not seen another Blue Jay around. I did launch her once and felt a little unstable. Couldn't see how it would handel two crew. I will make the repairs needed and hope to learn sailing her without capsizing.
From what I know, this a fairly forgiving boat.  There are lot of more modern designs out there. But you could do a lot worse if you are new to sailing.  For many years it was the premier boat for junior sailboat racing in many places in the US.  Ultimately, I think it became just too expensive to build. So you don't see it used as much anymore for kids.  Certainly, the fact the older boats are not self bailing could have been a factor. I've seen the self rescuing version and it seems a little flimsy.  I think with all the tanks and everything, it was difficult to keep the over all weight down.
And it's no light weight to begin with.  You may well be better off with the regular plywood version.
Best of luck with it.
Barney Post

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