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Author Topic: History on this daysailer.  (Read 3665 times)
Begrand
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Boat Type: 24' wooden daysailer

« on: October 05, 2010, 03:21:05 pm »

Hi....picked up this sailboat sitting in storage for years, original cloth sails and interior, all I did was sand and repaint the hull......Carpe Diem has been an absolute pleasure to sail. I do not know very much history on this boat since the builder had passed on.....looks like a kitboat? Any input would be great 24' in length.
Thanks Rob
« Last Edit: October 05, 2010, 05:30:03 pm by Begrand » Logged
Cormorant
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Boat Type: Jout Caprice, Vaurien


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« Reply #1 on: October 07, 2010, 11:26:46 am »

I've searched for anything on your 24 foot ketch, but with no luck. :( 

But looking closely at the photos I am sure you are correct that it is a home-built, or at least not a series boat. I say this because your boat (though lovely, and I would love to try her out) seems to have some rather straightforward areas of improvement. It's center of gravity seems off, for example.

On a side note, in looking at the photo of you under sail, you could actually get more power out of your sails if you were to move the anchorage point of your jib (I am referring to the larger blue mainsail) farther forward, a foot more (15 inches) would be great.

Remember, the headsails of a sailboat PULL the boat forward, and so when you have both up in a way that one disrupts the airflow over the other, you wil see a resulting loss of the necessary air needed to create the low pressure in front of them.

You see how the leading edges of your headsails are not parallell? This will mean that it will be impossible to generate an optimal airflow over the leading edge of them (because of their close proximity - it would not be an issue if the forwardmost sail were a goot 3 feet ahead). If you are unable to move the blue one forward, then you must anchor the bottom of the white one back a good foot.

Also, when there is little wind, you will want to not to tighten it so much. You need the extra curve of the sail to make an optimal shape to create the necessary low-pressure zone. If it is too tight (like in the photo) for the wind, you loose power, because the surface is irregular and cannot form a proper airfoil.

Also (sorry mate), in the photo you have your forempst headsail on the wrong side...the set-up in the photo is how you stop a sailboat. The larger, formost sail needs to be on the exterior of the other one.

Here, I made a photoshopped image that puts all of the above into something visual:



You will go much much faster keeping these in mind, in fact, your boat will take on a whole new level of performance :)
« Last Edit: October 07, 2010, 12:40:02 pm by Cormorant » Logged

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sonosail
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« Reply #2 on: October 08, 2010, 10:10:20 am »

The jib now looks serviceable. (almost)  Can't you do something with the mainsail. And then, of course, the mizzen could use a serious touch up.

Wouldn't it be nice if we could renew and reshape the actual sail with photoshop.

rb
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Cormorant
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Boat Type: Jout Caprice, Vaurien


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« Reply #3 on: October 08, 2010, 10:51:57 am »

Quote
Wouldn't it be nice if we could renew and reshape the actual sail with photoshop.

that would be soooooo lovely :)
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Begrand
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Boat Type: 24' wooden daysailer

« Reply #4 on: October 26, 2010, 05:38:17 am »

Thank You for the information....... New to the sport as a skipper......
In the photo it was the first day I had Carpe Diem out and wanted to have all sails up and actually I was under motor power...... Question in regard to a new Jib for next season.....in your opinion could I comfortably rig a fore sail to help power this boat?   
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sonosail
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« Reply #5 on: October 26, 2010, 01:29:53 pm »

Thank You for the information....... New to the sport as a skipper......
In the photo it was the first day I had Carpe Diem out and wanted to have all sails up and actually I was under motor power...... Question in regard to a new Jib for next season.....in your opinion could I comfortably rig a fore sail to help power this boat?
Didn't intend to make fun of the boat in any way. It looks like a beautiful, well made boat, that appears to be well worth maintaining in what appears to be  it's current pristine condition. I wish I had some way of knowing something of it's origins. The rig IS certainly unusual for this sized boat. All the sails look to be well past their  prime, which doesn't make them unusable. The jib, (or fore sail) could use a replacement.  I would get some measurements and look around some of the used sail establishments for something of a similar size. I would think that a new replacement would run between $400- $600.

Regards,
Randy Browning
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